Thursday, February 23, 2006

Coupons - part II - by Brad

Well... I had to research the question I posed in my previous post, and this is way to long to stick in the comments.

From what I read online, it has to do with coupon books issued during the depression and businesses taking advantage of the consumer. However, in Washington State, we have a law created in 1907 (well before the depression) that states:

RCW 19.84.020
Any person who shall sell or issue to any person… any… coupon… shall, upon presentation, redeem the same either in goods… or in cash… at the option of the holder thereof, and any number of such… coupons… shall be redeemed… at the value in cents printed upon the face thereof.

It sounds like this is to protect the consumer by allowing the consumer to request the value of the coupon in either goods, or cash. Therefore, if the business does not want to provide the goods at the discount price, they would be legally required to provide the cash value of the coupon. That must why they specifically state a cash value on the coupon.

I am kind of surprised that it states, "at the option of the holder", because this causes me wonder...

If I have a coupon for, "$10 off go-go boots", but it has no cash value stated, I could probably request the $10 cash from the company rather than the go-go boot discount.

Sorry to waste your time reading this, but this is the kind of garbage that goes on in my mind.

DISCLAIMER: PLEASE DO NOT PURSUE ANY LEGAL ACTION BASED ON THE INTERPRETATION OF WASHINGTON STATE LAW CONTAINED HEREWITHIN. THIS IF FOR INFORMATION ONLY AND SHOULD NOT BE CONSIDERED PROFESSIONAL LEGAL COUNSEL.

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